Creating – Throw It to Me! Throw It to Me!

I live in the Maleny area of the beautiful Sunshine Coast Hinterland in Queensland, Australia. The picturesque hillsides and rain forests make this countryside ideal for weddings and celebrations. I have been exploring the relationships that we have with flowers, especially the familiar tradition of bridal bouquets, and their being forwarded on after the wedding.

In this painting I wanted to capture the anticipation one might experience as the bouquet flies through the air.The majority of these roses and flowers have grown in our country garden, and all resources are my own photographs. Acrylic Paint, Ready to hang100.3cm (W) x 100.3cm (H) x 3cm (D) More Info: https://bluethumb.com.au/…/throw-it-to-me-throw-it-to-me

The first thing I realized after deciding on the design for this painting was that I really don’t know one rose from the other. My husband is the gardener, I just paint and photograph the flowers. Roses have such individual characteristics. After sketching several on to the canvas I discovered I was getting quite lost 🙂 I quickly numbered the photographs and sketched up a legend to keep me on track.

There are ten small Montville Roses (The Duchess of Brabant) to represent our hinterland. These were painted fresh from our new garden. The Cherry Blossom was from a photo taken in the Dandenongs, and it represents the Cherry Tree at One Tree Hill in Maleny. All, but one, of the roses were grown by my husband over the years. Roses symbolize love. Daisies and maiden hair fern symbolize innocence and purity.

Moi, signing off, snapped by my gardener 🙂

A Bluethumb Staff Pick

How exciting!! 😊

My artwork Throw It to Me! Throw It to Me! has been selected by Bluethumb Online Art Gallery as a Staff Pick last Friday (7th May) – thank you Bluethumb Team 💐

All the details are here: https://bluethumb.com.au/judi-parkinson/Artwork/throw-it-to-me-throw-it-to-me

WIP

My hubby sure has grown a lot of roses over the years. They are always absolutely beautiful. I have photographed so many of them, usually in the garden, sometimes as studio shots. And I have often painted them, usually in a traditional Still Life composition with a vase etc.

The Work in Progress

This is the first time I’ve painted them on such a large canvas, 100 x 100cm stretched linen. I’m working with acrylics and using the traditional oil painting technique – give or take a little artistic license, and a few complementary flowers 🙂

Some of my photos of my husband’s gardens and roses

So this week – I’ve still been painting them – there’s a lot 🙂

I’m not a gardener. To me – a rose is a rose is a rose! So I had to number the rose/photos and create a legend as I was quickly getting lost LOL!! I have scattered several pretty Montville Roses through the artwork and I’m picking these fresh from our new garden to paint directly.

We live in the sub-tropics, so although it is Autumn here, the weather is still in the high 20’sC and the paint is drying quite quickly, but I prefer not to use drying retarders. The only medium I add is Atelier Binder Medium diluted with water, 1 part in 4. Occasionally I add a light spray of water if it thickens. For large areas I mix the colours and store in jars, and just take out a little at a time to spare the paint drying too much.

WIP – Detail picture (also cover image) of roses so far with the darker tones painted

A Bluethumb Gallery Pick

How exciting!! 😊

My artwork ‘Garden Party in the Grevillea‘ has been selected by Bluethumb Online Art Gallery as a Daily Pick by Staff last Friday (19th) – thank you Bluethumb Team 💐

All the details are here: https://bluethumb.com.au/…/garden-party-in-the-grevillea

Sketching up a Design

This tip is for working on canvas with a smooth primed finish:

To keep the colours fresh for acrylic painting I usually sketch the composition in pastel. The colours blend in easily with the acrylic washes…. and the best part is that it can be wiped off with a damp rag should – there be an error 🙂 whereas charcoal may stain and graphite is difficult to remove.

The two images below show the pastel and acrylic washes as I constructed the painting, and then the finished oil painting Rununculi Medley.